DIY Lightweight Trailer For My S4

By Fin Gold

I usually keep my Wavewalk S4 on my dock so I can use it right there. But sometimes, we like to explore other areas. I don’t have a truck to transport it, so I decided to convert an old sailboat trailer into a Wavewalk S4 trailer.

All it took was some treated 2×6 and 2×4 boards, some U-bolts, and some ceramic deck screws.
I started with the trailer for a [brand name] sailing catamaran that I don’t use.
I’ve never trailered that boat.
The first step was to attach two 2×6 boards each with a U-bolt on the front and the back. On top of those, I screwed five 2×6 cross-boards so they support the boat from underneath all the way from front to back. Then I added 2×4 boards on both of the outside edges to provide an outer groove for the S4 to sit inside. A set of rollers from the sailboat trailer act as guides to align the inner hull of the S4.

The result? A very light but stable platform to pull my Wavewalk S4. When we get to the boat ramp we just back it down the ramp and the S4 slides off the trailer with an easy push. You should have seen the faces of the big boat owners at the ramp when I launched my boat with one finger!

The key to trailering the boat is to make sure it is tied down securely in the front and the back so that it doesn’t slide forward or backwards. I also have two lines over the top of the boat to hold it down, but be
careful not to over-tighten these and compress the hull. Also, remember to tilt the motor up if you have one so it doesn’t hit the ground as you trailer it.

Having a homemade trailer can extend the range of your Wavewalk adventures and save the hassle of loading it in or on top of your vehicle. All it takes is a used trailer and some treated boards!

Watertight riveting

If you want to use rivets in a DIY kayak rigging job, you may wonder how to make the rivets watertight, namely seal them.

The Wavewalk site features a new article about making a riveting job watertight
It explains how to use a popular, multipurpose, strong and watertight adhesive named Goop in a way that would work to achieve this goal.

 

How is the world’s best fishing kayak made?

The Wavewalk™ 700 promises to be the world’s best fishing kayak in the tandem plus solo category, whether human powered or motorized. This means it would work great for both a crew of two fishermen as for one fisherman.

In order to create such an unrivaled fishing kayak, its designers had to invent some new ways to make W catamaran kayaks in rotationally molded Polyethylene (PE).

Here’s a short computer-generated animation video that shows how the W700 is made:

 

We look forward to see how users of this new boat will rig it for fishing, and outfit it for other usages!

A seat for my fishing kayak?

The Kayak Fishing 101 website is dedicated to helping the beginning kayak angler, and one of the questions that some new Wavewalk anglers ask themselves is “Do I need to outfit my W with a seat?” By seat they mean an additional seating device on top of the W saddle-seat. Typically, such thoughts about ‘upgrading’ revolve around a swivel seat “bass boat style”, or something more simple.

There is no such need in reality, unless you want to sit much higher in a position that’s intermediary between sitting and standing, but since outfitting a kayak for fishing is a lot of fun, beginning anglers are sometimes motivated to overdo things.

There is no point in discussing in detail all the possibilities for outfitting a Wavewalk TM fishing kayak with an extra seat , but if the reader is interested in getting more information on this subject, and who knows – maybe some inspiration, they can find dozens of kayak seat articles and reviews on the Wavewalk website »

 

A few words on fishing kayak design

This blog’s theme is rigging kayaks for fishing, and we offer in it advice and tips to new kayak anglers. However, from time to time we also discuss fishing kayak design, and recommend more reading.

This time we’d like to recommend reading an article about the design of popular SOT fishing kayaks >
The article offers a fresh insight into the particular features of SOT kayaks, which are the vertical scupper holes and narrow longitudinal tunnels in their hulls’ underside. It explains the real reasons why these uncommon elements were introduced into practically every sit-on-top kayak, and what their real function is.

The article may be an eye opener for paddlers and anglers who’ve been exposed only to the ‘official’ versions that manufacturers and vendors of such kayaks offer.

So next time you’re out there paddling your SOT kayak or fishing from it, and you wonder why water is coming up from the scupper holes onto its deck, and why it is so slow and hard to paddle – you’ll know more.