A seat for my fishing kayak?

The Kayak Fishing 101 website is dedicated to helping the beginning kayak angler, and one of the questions that some new Wavewalk anglers ask themselves is “Do I need to outfit my W with a seat?” By seat they mean an additional seating device on top of the W saddle-seat. Typically, such thoughts about ‘upgrading’ revolve around a swivel seat “bass boat style”, or something more simple.

There is no such need in reality, unless you want to sit much higher in a position that’s intermediary between sitting and standing, but since outfitting a kayak for fishing is a lot of fun, beginning anglers are sometimes motivated to overdo things.

There is no point in discussing in detail all the possibilities for outfitting a Wavewalk TM fishing kayak with an extra seat , but if the reader is interested in getting more information on this subject, and who knows – maybe some inspiration, they can find dozens of kayak seat articles and reviews on the Wavewalk website »

 

Kayak Fishing After a Long New England Winter

I have already taken my W300 fishing kayak out of mothballs, but I still just don’t have “anything to write home about”.

While not impressive, the attached shows a recent bass caught with an emmrod fishing pole.

Massachusetts kayak fisherman with bass

I was hoping to get some decent pics to send along, but I have not gone out for more than a few hours, as work is keeping me busy…

Because there was not much ice this Winter, I made a few outings when the air was in the 40′s and water in the 30′s in March. Dry launch and landing in a W fishing kayak make this possible.

Chris from Central Massachusetts

Skye, the Kayak Fishing Pup From Connecticut

By Rox Davis

I took Skye out today for a little fishing trip at a Pond not far from my house.

dog puppy with a fish in a kayak - Connecticut
Skye looking at a bass caught in a kayak fishing trip

I promised her I would, since I left her home to chase some Stripers on the Ct River with my Buddy Mike yesterday.

Fishing was very tough, water is high and Muddy On the Ct River.

I did manage to land a nice fat Striper, I cast my 3/8 oz. jig rigged with a Berkeley Hollow belly in blue herring up next to a lay down close to shore and BAM…………………. ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ Pole bending and my tip is bouncing as this bad girl made her run down river, then I was reeling like a mad woman as she turned and swam back up river..

ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ ………….I finally gain some ground and get her boat side.

Mike got the lip grippers, and she’s in the boat.

My first Keeper of the season, 29 1/2” and 14#, fat and healthy.

big striper caught on Connecticut river

She swam away strong to fight another day.

Next Week, I’m taking the W500 out for my first Striper trip, My buddy Mike will be out in his Bass boat

keeping and eye on me, I can’t wait.

The pond gave up no big fish today, but that doesn’t matter, it was nice just being out on the water in my W500, fishing with my dog.

Tight Lines and MoPaddle Safe All.

Rox

dog puppy in fishing kayak - Connecticut

dog puppy in fishing kayak - Connecticut
puppy in fishing kayak

More from Rox, the bass kayak fishing expert >

Some Cool Ideas For Rigging Your Fishing Kayak – Motor Mount

A Kayak Transom Motor Mount

Let’s admit it – Paddling a fishing kayak can be fun, if you’re in the right kayak, but it’s a propulsion method that a but limited as far as your travel range is concerned.
You might be thinking about mounting a trolling motor, or an outboard gas engine on your kayak, and here’s a simple, easy to make DIY design for a sturdy transom motor mount:

2 hp Honda outboard motor mounted on W500 fishing kayak

The person who created this transom motor mount is Rox Davis, from Connecticut, one of America’s best bass kayak anglers. Read more about bass kayak fishing >>
The outboard motor in this picture is the 2hp 4-cycle from Honda – a fine motor indeed.

And this kayak motor mount was made by Glynn, a fly kayak fisherman from Texas:

DIY transom motor mount for fishing kayak, Texas

Read more about rigging your fishing kayak >>

And if you’re looking to read more, here’s an article about motorizing your fishing kayak >>

Lures That Work Well For Kayak Bass Fishing, by Roxanne Davis

Here is a couple of pictures of the lures and hooks I use, and have had great success with.

Lures for bass kayak fishing

Hooks for bass kayak fishing

The Yum Dinger, shown in both pictures, range from 6″ to 3″, and the 1/4 oz Jigs are in the top row of the picture.
As you see, I am also a Big Fan of the Chatter Bait.

Assorted lures for bass kayak fishing

Fly lures for bass kayak fishing

Maybe you’re fishing your jigs too fast – don’t hurry…
You have to make sure that these lures reach bottom, remember the 1/4oz jig takes a little longer getting to the bottom. Your lure has not reached bottom till you see your line go slack.
Then make short hops, and long pauses, with a twitch here and there.
And always keep contact with bottom, your line and jig.
You can pop it hard, just follow it back to the bottom with your tip, and be ready to set that hook!
Any kind of line movement, could be a strike, when in doubt, set that hook.
Most strikes will happen on the Fall, so always keep a close eye on your line as it sinks to the bottom.
A Bass can grab and spit that bad boy out before you even realize you missed a strike!

The Yum Dinger, can be fished many ways, as a jerk bait, finess, whacky rigged, placed on a ball jig, chatter bait (killer pike bait), or Dead sticking it.
Same as the jig, you must reach bottom, always watching that line for any signs of a strike on the fall, most will happen then.
But when the fish are in a negative mode, let it hit bottom, with long pauses between a pop, pop, pop, reel your slack line, and repeat all the way back to shore or
boat.
You can also add a small finish nail, or small screw to the butt of the dingers.
This will increase the fall rate, but not hurt the action.
Toss the dinger in 3′ of water and count it down till you reach bottom, then in deeper water you’ll have a better idea when it will reach the depth you want to fish.

Hope this helps –
Good Luck and Tight Lines.

Rox

Find more fishing kayak reviews >>