Attaching Gear To Your Fishing Kayak – The Easy Way. By Gary Rankel

Having seen some of the elaborate modifications W fishing kayak owners employ to attach paddles and other gizmos to their W’s, I thought I’d share a really easy, low-cost, no-weight method that I use.
When I first got my W’s, I drilled holes on each corner of the cockpit rim, primarily so that I could drain water out of the interior when turned upside down after washing down. Then I attached short pieces of waterproof rope thru the holes, knotting the bottom of each end to secure them(large flexible rubber washers can be installed about the knots to ensure that they don’t come thru the holes, but really aren’t needed). Finally, I attached 8-inch cable ties to the ropes or to the metal eyelets on the W to create carrying loops. You can see how I carry my Stick-it anchoring rod (stake out pole) on these devices.
Different sizes of metal clips can also be installed on the ropes to handle a paddle. By having holes and ropes on each corner of the rim, I can also attach an anchor to each, thereby eliminating the need for a pulley system (this works best if you can get by with just one length of anchor rope like you can fishing the shallow Florida flats).

Gary

rigging fishing kayak, improvements

rigging fishing kayak, improvements

rigging fishing kayak, improvements

rigging fishing kayak, improvements

rigging fishing kayak, improvements

rigging fishing kayak, improvements

rigging fishing kayak, improvements

Transportation Wheel For Your Fishing Kayak

Sometimes you need to transport your fishing kayak over long distances before launching it, or after you’ve returned from your fishing trip. In many cases, you can simply drag it on the ground, but in other cases, this is either impossible, or not advisable.

Depending where you need to go, the types of wheels and carts vary.
For straight and hard terrain, such as asphalt roads and parking lots, a single, small size wheel could suffice. The advantage of small wheels is that they don’t take much space once you carry them on board your kayak.
Here’s an example of a very simple, and easy to use transportation wheel solution from South Korea:

Wheel for transporting fishing kayak, Korea
Wheel for transporting fishing kayak, Korea

However, if you need to travel over deep, soft sand, a rocky road, or uneven pavement, you’d need to consider one or two large size wheels, and preferably such that are soft, as the inflatable wheel seen here:

transporting fishing kayak to the beach

getting ready to launch fishing kayak at the beach

This transportation wheel was realized by John Castanha, a W fishing kayak dealer in Tucson, Arizona.

learn more about wheels for fishing kayaks, and how to outfit fishing kayaks >>

Some Cool Ideas For Rigging Your Fishing Kayak – Motor Mount

A Kayak Transom Motor Mount

Let’s admit it – Paddling a fishing kayak can be fun, if you’re in the right kayak, but it’s a propulsion method that a but limited as far as your travel range is concerned.
You might be thinking about mounting a trolling motor, or an outboard gas engine on your kayak, and here’s a simple, easy to make DIY design for a sturdy transom motor mount:

2 hp Honda outboard motor mounted on W500 fishing kayak

The person who created this transom motor mount is Rox Davis, from Connecticut, one of America’s best bass kayak anglers. Read more about bass kayak fishing >>
The outboard motor in this picture is the 2hp 4-cycle from Honda – a fine motor indeed.

And this kayak motor mount was made by Glynn, a fly kayak fisherman from Texas:

DIY transom motor mount for fishing kayak, Texas

Read more about rigging your fishing kayak >>

And if you’re looking to read more, here’s an article about motorizing your fishing kayak >>

Kayak Fishing In Tandem – Is It Possible?…

Not an easy question to answer, since a kayak is essentially a solo boat, which doesn’t lend itself easily to tandem applications –
In principle, it’s possible, since many kayaks are big enough to take two passengers on board. But practically, having two anglers fishing out of a small vessel such as a kayak is problematic with regards to several aspects that command serious consideration:

The first problem is Safety – two passengers moving about in the cockpit or on the deck of a fishing kayak in an uncoordinated manner can easily destabilize it, with the result being one of them overreacting, and causing the kayak to capsize. Obviously, having fishing rods, lures and fish flying around in all direction in such a limited space isn’t the best a recipe for safety.

The second problem is Convenience – Every angler wants and needs to have an unlimited range of motion, in order to perform basic things such as casting, reeling, landing the fish, unhooking, etc. Angler also need to have a comfortable workspace for attaching lures and bait, and doing other technical work involving the manipulation of fishing gear, including sharp objects such as fishing hooks and knives.
The last thing you want when you’re fishing in tandem is to get your fishing lines entangled with those of your partner, or get poked in the eye by a misguided fishing hook, etc.. -The possibilities for a disaster are so numerous that it’s practically impossible to list them all in this article, but we assume the reader gets the point…

Unlike paddling a kayak in tandem, kayak fishing in tandem is more complicated, and more difficult, and as a rule of thumb we don’t recommend it, unless the crew is composed of one experienced adult kayak angler and one junior kayak angler, such as a child, who needs guidance and often even technical help with handling their fishing gear. In such case the obvious choice for a kayak is the W500 that features a 6 ft long cockpit, and a longitudinal seat that makes it possible for the two anglers to sit separated by a long span, but also to approach each other effortlessly and safely when they need to do something together, such as in case the experienced angler has to instruct the novice, or help them hands-on perform a fishing related task.

As far as standing up while kayak fishing in tandem, this is even more problematic, and should be practiced only after both anglers have practiced tandem kayak fishing before, as well as stand up kayak fishing. Needless to say that the kayak used for this type of fishing should be fit such such activities to begin with, and vendors’ claims about their kayaks’ stability should be taken with a good dose of caution, common sense, and sufficient skepticism. It’s good to remember that it’s you and fishing buddy that are going to be out there in the real world, and not some guys who get paid to demonstrate fishing kayaks in front of a camera…

Kayak fishing offshore in tandem is even more difficult, and hazardous, and we do not recommend it, unless both anglers are lightweight and very experienced fishing together out of small boats, such as dinghies and canoes. Fishing in tandem out of a kayak equipped with a powerful motor, such as an outboard gas engine adds yet another level of risk, and in such cases you may consider outfitting your kayak with a pair of large size outriggers, such as this South Korean couple is using on an offshore fishing trip:

Couple fishing in tandem in the ocean, in South Korea