Night Fishing in the Stand Up Fly Fishing Kayak, Florida

It was too windy to fish in the river so I stayed in the lagoon by where my friend lets me keep my “W” kayak on his floating dock. I had been out in the morning about 7:30 AM and caught a small snook about 14 inches – a beautiful fish and since I got him on a small foam rubber “gurgler” fly it was fun to see a fish take that surface fly less than a foot from the mangroves in about eight inches of water. It took a little while reviving him in the water before releasing him before I could go looking for his big brother.

Fished until about noon got a couple of hook ups but nothing came to the boat.

I went back just about 7 PM and staked out at the corner of a nice grass flat in the lagoon next to the mangrove creek that feeds in from the Indian River.

It was low incoming tide one of the best times for the bigger fish to get in close to the flat in about four to five feet of water, they slip up on the grass flat and raid the little mullet fingerlings and grass shrimp and can dash back into the deeper water for cover.

So I fished different flies and different sides of the flat for about an hour… fifteen minutes after sunset I was making my “last cast” for the night and bang a freight train hits my fly about thirty five feet from the kayak I am standing on my platform on top of the center tunnel and all the line starts to shoot out of my striping basket and (for once it is not tangled up) whiz all the line is out of the basket probably 125 feet or so and I am on the reel and it is buzzing. First time I am down to my backing line it is still going out to open water in the lagoon

(not back to the mangroves like sneaky snook usually do). So I let him go

I mean he is too big and hot to horse in with an eight weight and 10 lb

tippet. Three good runs, a couple of tries for the mangroves and 15 minutes later I have him in the boat.

snook caught in kayak night fly fishing, Florida

26″ snook WOW the first really nice fish I have ever caught out of the “W” and it was a beauty it took me almost 10 minutes to revive him pushing him through the water next to the boat.

But finally he swam off before I was eaten to death by Florida mosquito’s it was almost dark but I was as high as a tree frog just paddling back to the dock whistling Dixie.

I have caught a few smallish fish in the lagoon but started to think that all the nice ones are in the river.

Oh yeah all you northern woodsman who are wondering why I released a five pound snook instead of eating him, there is a limit here we call “slot” fish, 28″ to 32″ inches if they are in the slot then they are keepers but he was a little shy of the slot. And after one of the best battles I have had on fly since my Trinity river steelhead days, I figured he deserved a second chance anyway.

snook caught in kayak night fly fishing, Florida

I love my “W”… when that fish was on I was thinking he went 360 degrees around the boat did three really long runs and in general made 15 minutes feel like about three. I honestly don’t think there is any chance that this old man could have landed that fish in any other kayak but the Wavewalk fishing kayak. I mean I fish with a friend who has five kayaks SOT and Sit in type and he is an athlete, but I have seen how little room to

move and how cramped it is and if your line snags on anything when you have a big fish on a fly (even just for a moment) it is good by fish.

Ted, Florida

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Shallow Water Kayak Fishing – Bluegills in Wisconsin

My W fishing kayak allowed me to get into some Bluegills.
A regular boat would have spooked the fish, that’s if a boat would have been able to get to this spot in the first place.

I was able to sneak up in the shallow, weedy, back water areas to locate the Gills.
I kept a few of the nicer ones for a fresh Gill fry.

John

 

Wavewalk fishing kayak moving silently through the lilly pads

Bluegill fishing from a kayak

Kept a bluegill few for a fry

 

Attaching Gear To Your Fishing Kayak – The Easy Way. By Gary Rankel

Having seen some of the elaborate modifications W fishing kayak owners employ to attach paddles and other gizmos to their W’s, I thought I’d share a really easy, low-cost, no-weight method that I use.
When I first got my W’s, I drilled holes on each corner of the cockpit rim, primarily so that I could drain water out of the interior when turned upside down after washing down. Then I attached short pieces of waterproof rope thru the holes, knotting the bottom of each end to secure them(large flexible rubber washers can be installed about the knots to ensure that they don’t come thru the holes, but really aren’t needed). Finally, I attached 8-inch cable ties to the ropes or to the metal eyelets on the W to create carrying loops. You can see how I carry my Stick-it anchoring rod (stake out pole) on these devices.
Different sizes of metal clips can also be installed on the ropes to handle a paddle. By having holes and ropes on each corner of the rim, I can also attach an anchor to each, thereby eliminating the need for a pulley system (this works best if you can get by with just one length of anchor rope like you can fishing the shallow Florida flats).

Gary

rigging fishing kayak, improvements

rigging fishing kayak, improvements

rigging fishing kayak, improvements

rigging fishing kayak, improvements

rigging fishing kayak, improvements

rigging fishing kayak, improvements

rigging fishing kayak, improvements

DIY Wooden Paddle For Poling and Paddling Standing In Fishing Kayak

I finally finished that paddle I’ve been building forever, and have paddled it a bit. It’s working out quite well for the W kayak.
I laminated the shaft out of one layer of poplar in the center for stiffness, and a layer of cedar on each side.
The blade is a lamination of two different colored cedars along with a maple tip to take a bit more abuse.
The blades have fiberglass cloth epoxied over both surfaces, and the shaft is finished in Tung oil (China wood oil) over the bare wood.
I also included a ferule for the shaft so I can break it down, as well as feather the blades left or right.
The paddle is nice and light, and really moves the boat along well. I’m liking it a lot so far.
I’d like to build one with carbon fiber paddles at some point, but who knows how many years that would take a the rate I put this one together.

Kevin

DIY wooden paddle for fishing kayak

DIY wooden paddle for fishing kayak, front side

DIY wooden paddle for fishing kayak, back side

DIY 2 piece, adjustable wooden paddle for fishing kayak

Kevin is a fly fisherman from Florida who fishes mostly standing up in his W kayak. He paddles and poles his fishing kayak.

Choosing a Fishing Kayak: The Mobility Factor

When you come to choosing a fishing kayak, some important factors are simply not discussed by kayak vendors, just because the kayaks they produce rank so low in them. Mobility is such a factor that you won’t find mentioned anywhere, except on sites related to Wavewalk fishing kayaks, which are the only truly mobile fishing kayaks out there. So what is Mobility in the kayak fishing world, and why is it worth your attention when you think about choosing a fishing kayak?

KAYAK MOBILITY DEFINED

Anybody can understand that a 4×4 off-road SUV is more mobile than a common, two-wheel drive car. Most people realize that a skin-on-frame Inuit kayak is less durable than a modern plastic kayak, and you couldn’t paddle it in some of the places that you’re used to paddle in. But what does mobility mean when it comes to today’s fishing kayaks?
It basically has to do with whatever limits kayak anglers from going where they want to:
Such limits include spots that are too difficult to launch your kayak from, or too difficult to beach it in. Other limits can be water that’s too difficult to paddle in because of currents, waves, ice, vegetation or submerged obstacles such as wooden logs or rocks.

Weather conditions can limit you as well: Canoes are difficult to paddle on windy days and so are most kayaks, including touring kayaks.
So, if for whatever reason you’re prevented from using some beach or going somewhere on a fishing trip with your kayak, it means your fishing kayak’s performance is limited in terms of Mobility.

WHY IS MOBILITY IMPORTANT?

Your fishing kayak’s mobility goes two things that matter to you:
Safety: You won’t drive a two-wheel drive car in a snowstorm or on ice because it’s unsafe to do so. Similarly, you wouldn’t paddle a kayak with limited mobility in water or weather conditions that are not suitable for it, and you won’t launch or beach it where you might capsize.
Freedom: You don’t think of a two-wheel drive as a great outdoors vehicle since its limited mobility would restrict your freedom of movement. This argument may be circular, but apparently too few kayakers pay attention to this issue, especially touring and sea kayakers.
What’s a fast kayak good for if it requires special places for launching and beaching? Why can’t you paddle a fast, expensive touring kayak in a fast stream or have fun with it in the surf?
And if you’re a kayak angler the advantage of replacing your big, trailed motorboat by a car top fishing kayak is considerably reduced if you can’t launch it, fish with it, and beach it anywhere you want.

KAYAK MOBILITY REDEFINED

The W kayak offers a level of mobility that’s unprecedented, and may even be inconceivable for some.
Mobility is a feature that’s easy to demonstrate, and a picture tells more than words, especially if it’s moving. Therefore, it seems like the most appropriate thing to do at this point would be to have the reader watch this online movie showing kayak anglers and touring kayakers can go above and beyond obstacles in shallow water:

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9YgN6NkYyMY?rel=0&w=640&h=360]

SUPER MOBILITY

When Wavewalk talks about Super Mobility, or Extreme Mobility, many people find it hard to imagine what it could mean.
When Wavewalk says ‘Launch anywhere, go anywhere and beach anywhere’, some think it’s just another marketing phrase, but it’s not – The W500 kayak keeps expanding kayak fishing in every dimension. When compared to other types of kayaks, it is not just the world’s best kayak for fishing – it’s in a league of its own, and it’;s worthwhile tom take this fact into consideration when you’re trying to choose the next kayak you’re going to fish from. Actually, it’s a no brainer…

About

Hello and welcome to my website. My name is Fin Gold, and I’m a Wavewalk S4 kayak-skiff owner from Emerald Isle, North Carolina. For years,…